London General
London General Omnibus Company Maps
1929–1934

Last updated 12 July 2010

 

1910–1922 | 1922–1928 | 1928–1929 | 1929–1934 | Route Guides

No. 5 & 6 1929

No. 7 1929
No. 8 1929
No. 8 1929
No. 8 1929
No. 8 1929
No. 8 1929
No. 8 1929

No. 9 1929
No. 10 1929
No.10. 1929

No. 11 & 12 1929

No.1 1930
No.1 1930
No. 3 1930
No. 3 1930
No. 5 1930
No. 5 1930
No.7 1930
No.7 1930
No.9 1930
No.9 1930
No. 11. 1930
No. 11. 1930
No. 11. 1930
No. 11. 1930

1972 reprint
Note: Although numbered by London General in the same series as maps, even-numbered editions in 1930 were actually 48-page guides: stapled booklets listing all the LGOC routes, with their frequencies and fares. They were 318" × 6" (8cm × 15cm), the same size as folded maps.
No. 1 1931
No. 1 1931
“ I am told there are people who do not care for maps and I find it hard to believe. ”
R.L.S.

No. 2 1931
“ I am told there are people who do not care for maps and I find it hard to believe. ”
R.L.S.
No. 3 1931
No. 3 1931
“ I am told there are people who do not care for maps and I find it hard to believe. ”
R.L.S.
No. 3 1931
No. 3 1931
No. 4 1931
No. 4 1931
“ I am told there are people who do not care for maps and I find it hard to believe. ”
R.L.S.
Nos. 5 & 6 1931
No. 5 & 6 1931
“ As soon as you have mastered the language of a map, you have mastered the clue to a new and never-ending joy. ”
Robert Mearns.
No. 7 1931
No. 7 1931
“ As soon as you have mastered the language of a map, you have mastered the clue to a new and never-ending joy. ”
Robert Mearns.
No. 8 1931
No. 8 1931
“ As soon as you have mastered the language of a map, you have mastered the clue to a new and never-ending joy. ”
Robert Mearns.
No. 9 1931
No. 9 1931
“ As soon as you have mastered the language of a map, you have mastered the clue to a new and never-ending joy. ”
Robert Mearns.
No. 10 1931
No. 10 1931
“ As soon as you have mastered the language of a map, you have mastered the clue to a new and never-ending joy. ”
Robert Mearns.
No. 11 & 12 1931
No. 11 & 12 1931
“ As soon as you have mastered the language of a map, you have mastered the clue to a new and never-ending joy. ”
Robert Mearns.

No. 1 1932
No. 1 1932
“ I flatter myself, this exercise of travelling is beneficial to my health. ”
No. 2 1932
No. 2 1932
“ To begin methodically I should enjoin you travel. ”
No. 2 1932
enlarge…
No. 2 1932
enlarge…
No. 3 1932
No. 3 1932
“ For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The greatest affair is to move. ”
No. 4 1932
No. 4 1932
“ The value of life deepens incalculably with the privileges of travel. ”
No. 5 1932
No. 5 1932
“ Travel gives a character of experience to our knowledge, and brings the figures upon the tablet of memory into strong relief. ”

No. 6 1932
No. 7 1932
No. 7 1932
“ Travel in the younger sort, is a part of education; in the elder a part of experience. ”
No. 8 1932
No. 8 1932
“ Many a man who has gone but a few miles from home, understands human nature better. ”
No. 8 1932
No. 8 1932
No. 8 1932
No. 8 1932

No. 9 1932

No. 10 1932

No. 11 1932
No. 12 1932
No. 12 1932
“ Go travel for a while. ”
SHAKESPEARE.

No. 1 1933
No. 1 1933
“ Go travel for a while. ”
SHAKESPEARE.
No. 1 1933
No. 1 1933
No. 2 1933
No. 2 1933
No. 3 1933
No. 3 1933
“ London, thou art of townes A per se.
Soveraign of cities, someliest in sight,
Of high renoun, riches, and royaltie …
Of merchauntis full of sybstaunce and of
myght;
London, thou art the flour of Cities all. ”
◀ Nº 3 1933 was the first Central Area bus map produced under the auspices of the new London Passenger Transport Board, although that identification was only stamped onto the cover. This edition also exists with the words LONDON PASSENGER TRANSPORT BOARD overprinted on the cover.
The initials of the L.P.T.B. appeared on the cover of the Nº 4 1933 map, but were replaced with LONDON TRANSPORT in subsequent issues. ▶
No. 4 1933
No. 4 1933
“ And there fell out a map with latitude and longitude, names of streets, and every particular that would be needed. ”
After R. L. S.

This map was also issued as a reprint.
One of the intermediate issues of maps and detailed route guides between the London General influence finally biting the dust, and the new London Transport image appearing. The first edition of the Winter 1933-34 map had WINTER SERVICE in two lines, the second in one. ▼
Winter 1933-4
Winter 1933-4
“ The Omnibus is a handsome machine in the shape of a van accomodating 18 persons, and drawn by three beautiful bays. ”
Morning Post, July, 1829.
Winter 1933-4
Winter 1933-4
“ The Omnibus is a handsome machine in the shape of a van accomodating 18 persons, and drawn by three beautiful bays. ”
Morning Post, July, 1829.
Winter 1933
2nd edition
enlarge…
Winter 1933
2nd edition
enlarge…

Nº 1 1934
Nº 1 1934
“ The Omnibus is a handsome machine in the shape of a van accomodating 18 persons, and drawn by three beautiful bays. ”
Morning Post, July, 1829.
Nº 2 1934
Nº 2 1934
“ The value of life deepens incalculably with the privilege of travel. ”
◀ The last London bus map issued with the GENERAL name on it.

1910–1922 | 1922–1928 | 1928–1929 | 1929–1934 | Route Guides
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